Tag Archives: coloring

Precepts and Observations

William Oram wrote one book, the posthumously-published Precepts and Observations on the Art of Colouring in Landscape Painting. The book was prepared and edited by Charles Clarke from Oram’s original manuscripts notes, and published in 1810. It appears that the notes were mostly compiled in the 1750s and the manuscripts was fairly complete – there are certainly places where Oram may have intended a fuller treatment, but the core chapters are well worked out.

 

PRECEPTS AND OBSERVATIONS

 

ON

 

THE ART OF COLOURING

 

IN

 

LANDSCAPE PAINTING,

 

BY THE LATE WILLIAM ORAM, ESQ.

 

O.F HIS MAJESTY’S BOARD OF WORKS.

 


 

Quid si Naturre fas explorare sagaci

Mente vias. Vanier. Prr.ed. Rust. l. xi.

 


 

Arranged from the Author’s original MS. and published

by CHARLES CLARKE, Esq. F. S. A.

 


 

l.ondon :

 

PR I NTED FOR WHITE AND COCHRANE, HORACE’s HEAD, FLEET STREET;

 

BY RICHARD TAYLOR AND CO, SHOE LANE,

 

M.DCCC.X

 

The text stays close to the topic of the title. It is principally concerned with the choices and application of colour in painting landscapes, especially the handling of skies and trees. Oram opens with a couple of short chapters giving theoretical background to why the color of sky varies around the horizon and from horizon to zenith at different times of day, and the changing colors and details of trees at different distances from the observer. These early chapters are a little perfunctory and were possibly something he might have revisited before publication. In Chapter 5 he really gets going, with the treatment of skies and how to lay in the colors of skies and clouds for different types of light. The book is a technical manual of the application of oils. Here is a sample paragraph:

Again, for a sky with a warmer horizon, representing a time nearer the evening than the former:– Let the horizon be made with light red and white, and so growing into a bluish colour, with a small mixture of Indian red in that tint between the light red horizon and the bluest part of the sky. The clouds upon the horizon should be made up with blue and white, with lake only in their shades, and terra di sienna and white with a little light ochre in their lights.

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